charlesituah

Charles Ituah Ituah من عند Dhuriyan, Punjab 144210، الهند من عند Dhuriyan, Punjab 144210، الهند

قارئ Charles Ituah Ituah من عند Dhuriyan, Punjab 144210، الهند

Charles Ituah Ituah من عند Dhuriyan, Punjab 144210، الهند

charlesituah

Vonnegut takes the reader through an emotional space-coaster ride as he convinces us life is full of good and bad luck, life is meaningless, God is indifferent, we are pawns in mundane tasks for other worlds, and finally, the reason that we are all here (I won't give it away, though). He was able to create characters that we sympathized with while we disliked them. In fact, I don't think there is anyone in this book you will outrightly like. But the closest you will come is feeling very sorry for Chrono and even a little bit for Salo, both products and agents in the universe's utilitarian design. My favorite part of reading this book was trying to identify religious allegories and criticisms. Here's what I can remember off the top of my head: -Even though Rumfoord blatantly says he is not God or in any way related to God, his "prophecies" reek of pre-destination, and his exile of Constant/Unk and Beatrice/Bee seem pretty parallel to Adam and Eve. And hell if Titan doesn't seem a lot like the Garden of Eden. Oh, and chrono-synclastic infundibulation also seems a lot like omniscience. -Simultaneously, Rumfoord is a charactiture of enterprising Evangelists -The Martian War reminds me of two religious stories: Sacrifice of life for the life of others (Jesus), and eradication of a planet to create a better planet afterward (the Flood) -When Constant/Unk reuinites (at least in his mind) with Stony Stevenson on his way to Paradise and looks forward to reuniting with Bee, this is clearly an indication of an afterlife.