davidsmillan

David S S من عند Ihalawatta, سريلانكا من عند Ihalawatta, سريلانكا

قارئ David S S من عند Ihalawatta, سريلانكا

David S S من عند Ihalawatta, سريلانكا

davidsmillan

نُشر هذا الكتاب في الأصل عام 1915 ، وهو جزء من سلسلة ضخمة كتبها عالم الطبيعة ثورنتون بورغيس. يستهدفون الأطفال الأوائل ، يروون المغامرات الخيالية لمختلف كائنات الغابات. إنهم يشبهون إلى حد ما عيد ميلاد آفي الخشخاش وإرثه. قرأت هذه الكتب كطفل وأستمتع كثيراً باستكشافها. أنها تحظى بشعبية مع مجموعات تلاميذ المدارس ، وبعضهم لا يصدق أي شيء مكتوب بعد عام 1950 هو أي خير. (توفي بورغيس في عام 1964) ليس الأدب العظيم بأي وسيلة ، لكنها ممتعة لقراءة ومشاركة مع أطفالك.

davidsmillan

I liked the book, however it was a long read.

davidsmillan

this was a great book bit on the odd wierd crazy side but wat great book isnt

davidsmillan

I bought this book (for $2 at Goodwill, hardbound) because I hated the movie. Strange right? Well, I knew after watching the movie that something was missing, and that the book could't have won a prize for no reason. So, since I got such a good deal on the book, I decided to investigate to see if I could find what I had missed. I quickly realized what the book has that the film does not, is character development! While watching the movie I wasn't able to get a good feel for the context of Robbie and Cecilia's relationship. Their romance and then ensuing tragedy therefore are a bit underwhelming. The book however makes their internal and external lives much more accessible to the reader, which in turn creates a more powerful impact. The film was emotionally dry in comparison. What translated well onto the screen or at least what was interpreted well by the director, cinematographer, set designer etc. was the atmosphere that surrounded the characters. I was enchanted by McEwan's ability to perfectly describe every nuance of the character's surroundings. Granted I had seen the movie first so I already had a preprepared mental image but it was clear from the writing that the scenery came directly from the author and not the filmmakers. McEwan is just as adept at describing the interior lives of the characters, especially Briony, this story's central figure. By using an omniscient narrator McEwan is able to tell more about each character than he or she might be able to tell about themselves. This makes for a fantastic psychological read. I like getting into a character's head and I respect an author who can observe with equal power the world we live in and the worlds that exist inside of us. I look forward to reading another book from McEwan.