chama_chemo

Juan Carlos Cabadas Carlos Cabadas من عند نيويورك من عند نيويورك

قارئ Juan Carlos Cabadas Carlos Cabadas من عند نيويورك

Juan Carlos Cabadas Carlos Cabadas من عند نيويورك

chama_chemo

I had a great time reading this "out loud" to my young son over the course of a week during summer evenings. He was rapt, and we both ended up using the words "abate" and "abated" liberally for some days thereafter! Good adventure tale, and I had not read it since I was around 12y.o. myself.

chama_chemo

The Marquis of Kingsbury has two children, now adults, Hampstead and Frances. He brought them up with liberal notions, but now that their mother has died and he has remarried, he has returned to the political conservatism befitting his station in life. But, alas, those liberal notions have taken hold in his children, and Frances seeks to marry a clerk in the post office, while Hampstead courts a Quaker, the Marion Fay of the title. This is of course familiar Trollope territory -- children seeking "unsuitable" marriages and the troubles that result. Some think that in Marion Fay Trollope resolved these problems in a particularly sentimental fashion, but there was a lot I liked about this novel. There is a good comic subplot involving incompetence at the post office (recall that Trollope spent many years as a clerk there himself). And the almost murderously conniving step-mother of Hampstead and Frances is good. Trollope died shortly after Marion Fay was published, but, madly industrious novelist that he was, he had four more novels already finished that were published posthumously, as was his autobiography, which he had intended only for posthumous publication.