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O من عند Buck Creek, AB T0C 0S0، كندا من عند Buck Creek, AB T0C 0S0، كندا

قارئ O من عند Buck Creek, AB T0C 0S0، كندا

O من عند Buck Creek, AB T0C 0S0، كندا

erkmene

If you are comparing the literary value of science fiction/fantasy books, I think it is best to use food as an example. Terry Brooks can be viewed as a really good bacon cheeseburger, it is fun to eat, makes you feel full, however it is often sloppily put together in a hurried fashion, without much effort and does not give your body true fulfillment. While Tolkien on the other hand, or C.S. Lewis, are like well planned home cooked meals, with each food group represented and placed on a finely set dining table. Both are food, and both are great in their own respects. Just very different in execution and planning. I do like Brook's vision of the fantasy races and world formed by the aftereffects of a devastating nuclear war sometime in the near future.

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I'd recommend this book, an exploration of the cumulative effect of trauma exposure on service providers and other folks involved in trying to save the planet. It's getting a 4 just because it started out pretty rationally, with lots of profiles and cartoons, but the second half took a turn and got more spiritual, which would lose some of the folks I was thinking of recommending it to. But valuable concepts, nonetheless. The front cover has a Langston Hughes quote from "The Dream Keeper": "Bring me all of your dreams, you dreamers, bring me all of your heart melodies That I may wrap them in a blue cloud-cloth Away from the too-rough fingers of the world" --"I finally came to understand that my exposure to other people's trauma had changed me on a fundamental level. There had been an osmosis: I had absorbed and accumulated trauma to the point that it had become part of me, and my view of the world had changed." (p 3) --"In the fields where I work, there is historically a widely held belief that if you're tough enough and cool enough and committed to your cause enough, you'll keep on keeping on, you'll suck it up: Self-care is for the weaker set." (p 3) --"Those who support trauma stewardship believe that both joy and pain are realities of life, and that suffering can be transformed into meaningful growth and healing when a quality of presence is cultivated and maintained even in the face of great suffering." (p 11) --"Service rationing refers to the process that workers go through to bridge the everyday divide between the ideal of how they would work if they were free to function to the best of their ability and the reality of how they can work, given the numerous obstacles in their way." (p 22) --"once you know what it's like to be fueled by adrenaline on a consistent basis, it's hard to go back to a more measured and natural emotional state. We find that workplaces often adopt a very harried pace even when there's no crisis. Action for its own sake keeps people moving, makes them superficially productive, and limits their capacity for reflection about their lives. This becomes seductive, even to workers, because we can confuse being amped up, attending to crises (some of which create) , and having a sense of being needed with being fully awake, living life, and being effective." (p 106) --"I run the risk, as we all do, of relying too much on my work for my sense of esteem. When that happens, I can start to feel dependent on other people's suffering and their need for me to relieve it, for my own feeling of purpose." (p 113) --"When we keep ourselves numbed out on adrenaline or overworking or cynicism, we don't have an accurate internal gauge of ourselves and our needs." (p 131) --"What humans often do to reconcile this lack of control is to create and re-create situations as similar to the traumatic incident as possible. We seek to turn a traumatic situation in which we once felt powerless into a new situation where we feel competent and in charge. We tell ourselves that this time there will be a different outcome. Or so we hope." (p 156) --"...your core self is not what you do for work. Rumi, the 13th-century Persian jurist, theologian, and poet, wrote, "Let yourself be silently drawn by the stronger pull of what you really love." (p 181) --"It is also a very good plan every now and then to go away and have a little relaxation, for when you come back to the work, your judgment will be surer, since to remain constantly at work will cause you to lose the power of judgment. It is also advisable to go some distance away, because then the work appears smaller, and more of it is taken in at a glance, and a lack of harmony or proportion in the various parts and the colors of the objects is more readily seen." (Leonardo da Vinci, p 211) --"Viewing our most challenging relationships as our teachers can help make bleak times bearable. It also roots us in humility and graciousness, which is much better than arrogance and indignation." (p 223) The puglisher, Berrett-Koehler, says they offer quantity discounts for orders of 10 copies or more. 800-929-29292 or [email protected]